Thank You Dr. Craig

Published in News on 1/14/2019

Among his most important, valuable, and long-lasting contributions, not only to the DOE Emergency Management system but to emergency managers around the world, were his development of the Temporary Emergency Exposure Limits (TEELs) and development of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM).

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“It is with great sorrow that we share the sad news of the passing of Dr. Douglas K. Craig. Dr. Craig made numerous contributions to the DOE emergency management community over a long and illustrious career,  those of us who were privileged to work closely with Doug and enjoyed his company  are heartbroken by the loss of our brilliant, inquisitive, engaging, and entertaining friend.  Most notable, among many contributions, were Doug’s pioneering efforts  in developing, populating, and maintaining DOE’s Temporary Emergency Exposure Limits (TEELs)  – an invaluable emergency management tool for safety planning, hazards assessment, consequence assessment, and protective actions,” wrote Cliff Glantz Project Manager/Senior Staff Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 
Dr. Craig died of heart failure just a few minutes after his son David and his granddaughter visited him December 27th.  David sends these words to friends, colleagues, and others. “I know my father, and I’m sure he would be pleased if anyone so-inclined would enjoy a round of golf followed by a beverage (ideally a nice lager) at the 19th hole in his memory.   Send a Christmas card or a letter to an old friend or far-flung relative that you haven’t been in touch with for a while.  In addition, a donation in the name of his beloved late wife Joan Craig to the Susan G. Komen Foundation or the American Red Cross would be fitting.”
Born and raised in South Africa, Douglas K. Craig – Doug, earned a master's degree in physics and mathematics at the University of Witwatersrand and later worked in the South African nuclear industry. After immigrating to the United States, he became a US citizen and earned master's and doctorate degrees in radiation biology and toxicology. He worked in various departments of Battelle before joining the DOE complex at the Savannah River Site.
Among his most important, valuable, and long-lasting contributions, not only to the DOE Emergency Management system but to emergency managers around the world, were his development of the Temporary Emergency Exposure Limits (TEELs) and development of the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM).
“Doug's TEEL legacy will continue to be an invaluable resource for emergency managers’ world-wide for years to come.” said, Rocky Petrocchi, friend and member of the EMI SIG Subcommittee on Technical Analysis and Response Support.
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