Paul Grano, One of our own

Published in News on 6/7/2018

Paul Grano, a member of the Field and First Responders Subcommittee (FFRSC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD) has attained the highly-respected designation of Executive Fire Officer (EFO) upon completion of coursework at the National Fire Academy. The four-year program consists of two weeks annually of onsite Academy classes and authoring four applied research papers.

Tagged Under: Training

Paul Grano, a member of the Field and First Responders Subcommittee (FFRSC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD) has attained the highly-respected designation of Executive Fire Officer (EFO) upon completion of coursework at the National Fire Academy.  The four-year program consists of two weeks annually of onsite Academy classes and authoring four applied research papers. 

 

“It was a great experience,” Grano said.  He said the program was intense, but the knowledge and experienced gained was worth the effort. 

 

It took about 25 hours just to fill out the application.  “At first I was wondering what I was getting myself into,” he quipped.  “How difficult was the program going to be if it took all that time just to fill out the application?” It took 30-40 hours of pre-course work to prepare for the classroom work and each paper took about 150 hours of research and preparation.  He said he had invested 1000 plus hours into the four-years of coursework – most of those on his own time working weekends and after hours.

 

Grano said the most difficult part for him was the first research paper, because he had never written one before. “I finished it with some apprehension,” he said, “but got a good grade on it and the next three were a lot easier.”  His four research papers were on, company officer development for the LAFD, a fall-prevention program for elderly people in Los Alamos County, pre-incident planning, and ball sports as they relate to firefighter fitness.

 

He said the networking at the Academy was invaluable. “You get to meet people from every size department and emergency management discipline. With such diverse backgrounds, it was a great opportunity to share experiences and learn from one another.” He noted the importance of being able to bounce coursework assignments off one another, getting really good feedback, before they got handed in.

 

Grano said learning how to do research and analyze data was extremely beneficial.  “Fire service is trending to more data-driven evidence-based analysis,” he said. “It’s the justification city, county, and state governments are looking for when you request new equipment, additional staffing or salary increases.”

 

Grano joined LAFD in 1998 and was promoted to Captain in 2005 and Battalion Chief in 2012. In 2013 he was assigned as the Los Alamos National Laboratory Training Division Chief and is responsible for coordinating LANL-required training, drills and exercises for Lab personnel.

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